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Japanese Cargo Ship Heads for the International Space Station 2011.01.23

Tanegashima Space Center, Japan - January 22, 2011 - The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) today launched the H-IIB Launch Vehicle No.2 with the KOUNOTORI2, a cargo transfer vehicle to the International Space Station onboard, from the Tanegashima Space Center.

A Japanese H-IIB (H-2-B) rocket launched from the Tanegashima Space Center.
Courtesy of JAXA
 

Tanegashima Space Center, Japan - January 22, 2011

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
and
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.


The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched the H-IIB Launch Vehicle No.2 (H-IIB F2) with the KOUNOTORI2 (HTV2), a cargo transfer vehicle to the International Space Station, onboard at 2:37:57 p.m. on January 22, 2011 (Japan Standard Time, JST) from the Tanegashima Space Center.

A Japanese H-IIB (H-2-B) rocket launched from the Tanegashima Space Center.
Courtesy of JAXA
 
The launch vehicle flew smoothly, and, at about 15 minutes and 13 seconds after liftoff, the separation of the KOUNOTORI2 was confirmed.

A Japanese H-IIB (H-2-B) rocket launched from the Tanegashima Space Center.
Courtesy of JAXA
 
We would like to express our profound appreciation for the cooperation and support of all related personnel and organizations that helped contribute to the successful launch of the H-IIB F2.

A Japanese H-IIB (H-2-B) rocket launched from the Tanegashima Space Center.
Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 
At the time of the launch, the weather was clear, a wind speed was 8.3 meters/second from the north-west and the temperature was 10.6 degrees Celsius.


KOUNOTORI2 Separates from the H-IIB Second Stage

Separations of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB-A), the Fairing, the H-IIB First Stage occurred just as planned.

Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 
The H-IIB Second Stage
burned out approximately 15 minutes after launch, and the KOUNOTORI2 was successfully separated from the H-IIB Second Stage.

Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 
Then, the KOUNOTORI2 was inserted into the planned initial orbit.

The NASA's TDRS
Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 

KOUNOTORI2 Initiates Communications with Tsukuba (HTV MCR)

The KOUNOTORI2
has successfully established communications with the NASA's TDRS, and initiated communications with the HTV Mission Control Room (HTV MCR) at the Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC).

JAXA – Tsukuba Space Center
Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 
The KOUNOTORI2 also established two-axis attitude.

Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 

KOUNOTORI2 Establishes Three-Axis Attitude


KOUNOTORI2 Establishes Three-Axis Attitude (January 22, 2011)

The NASA's TDRS
Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 
The KOUNOTORI2 has successfully established three-axis attitude at 3:36 p.m. January 22.

Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 
KOUNOTORI's system
self-checks are ongoing in preparation for its first phase adjusting maneuver (Phase Maneuver1: PM1) scheduled at 10:08 p.m. January 22.

Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 

KOUNOTORI2 Completes the First Phase Maneuver (PM1)

The KOUNOTORI2 completed the first Phase Maneuver (PM1) at 10:13 p.m., January 22.

Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 
Next HTV2 mission status update will be posted on Monday morning, January 24, 2011.

Photo from YouTube JAXA Channel
 
The KOUNOTORI2 will fly to the ISS, then, on January 28, 2011 (JST,) it is slated for berthing with the ISS.


HTV2 Mission


On the HTV2 Mission, JAXA’s H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV), KONOTORI, will make the second flight to the International Space Station (ISS).

 
 
During the HTV1 Mission (September 2009), the HTV maiden flight vehicle (HTV1) demonstrated its autonomous and remotely-controlled rendezvous capabilities while delivering cargo/supplies to the ISS.

Having achieved the remarkable performance during the HTV1 Mission, the HTV2 Mission will focus on ISS cargo transportation activities.


Mission Objectives


The HTV2 Mission’s primary objectives include launch of the second H-IIB launch vehicle, cargo delivery to the ISS, and support of the station’s trash disposal.

After the HTV1 Mission, some modifications were made to HTV’s original configuration and operational procedures based on the HTV1 mission results.

During the HTV2 Mission, performances of the modified parts will be monitored.

Major modifications are as follows.


HTV Pressurized Logistics Module (PLC)

• Cargo loading capacity of the HTV Re-supply Rack (HRR) was increased by modifying its cargo layout

• Cargo capacity of the PLC was increased by creating additional cargo spaces inside the PLC

• Of four lights inside the PLC, two lights were replaced to domestic (Japanese) LED lights.


Avionics Module

• The total number of onboard batteries was reduced. In addition, the onboard batteries were upgraded

• Onboard rendezvous flight software was modified

• Space Integrated GPS/Inertial Navigation System (SIGI) software was modified

• Proximity Link System String B transponder was replaced to a domestic (Japanese) transponder


Propulsion Module

• Some of the injection temperature sensors on the HTV’s Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters were modified to increase the upper measurement range


Payload (Cargo)


The HTV2 delivers approximately 5,300 kg of cargo to the ISS.

KOBAIRO Rack (before Installation to the HTV PLC)
Courtesy of JAXA
 
For pressurized cargo, the HTV2 delivers JAXA’s two science racks, KOBAIRO Rack and the Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR).

Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR)
Courtesy of JAXA
 
This is the first time that the HTV delivers JAXA’s science experiment rack to the ISS.

Layout of the Science Racks on board Kibo
Courtesy of JAXA
 
In addition, the HTV2 Mission delivers potable water to the ISS.

HTV Exposed Pallet (EP)
Courtesy of JAXA
 
For unpressurized cargo, the HTV2 delivers NASA’s two Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs), the Cargo Transport Container (CTC) and the Flex Hose Rotary Coupler (FHRC), to the ISS.

These unpressurized ORUs will be stored outside of the ISS for later use.


The HTV2 Mission Major Events


On the HTV2 Mission, the HTV will be berthed to the ISS on FD8.

While the HTV stays at the ISS, supply/cargo transfer between the HTV and the ISS will be performed.

HTV1 Mission Event Sequence
Courtesy of JAXA
 
The HTV will then be loaded with trash and used materials, and unberthed from the ISS.

Finally, the HTV will reenter the Earth’s atmosphere.


HTV2 Operations Control


After separating from the H-IIB launch vehicle, the HTV will automatically activate the HTV subsystems, stabilize its attitude, and perform self-checks on the HTV components.

Then, the HTV will establish communications with the TDRS and initiate communications with the HTV MCR at TKSC.

HTV Operation Control Overview
Courtesy of JAXA
 
Once communications between the HTV and the HTV MCR is established, HTV flight control by the HTV MCR will begin.

The HTV MCR will monitor HTV’s telemetry and flight data, and send commands for controlling the HTV subsystems and maneuvering its flight.

From 90 minutes before the HTV reaches 5 km behind the ISS (Approach Initiation (AI) point), the HTV MCR and MCC-H will collaboratively operate the HTV mission.


SOURCE: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

http://www.jaxa.jp/countdown/h2bf2/index_e.html  

http://iss.jaxa.jp/en/htv/mission/htv-2/  

http://iss.jaxa.jp/en/htv/mission/htv-2/news/  



Video
Japanese Cargo Ship Heads for the International Space Station

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svUMzW3kV1s&feature=related  


Video
Japan successfully launch cargo rocket

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t34tSHeking&feature  


Video
Launch of KOUNOTORI2/H-IIB F2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8xdk60m0ik&feature  



ASTROMAN Magazine - 2011.01.07

A New Type of Launch Vehicle: A Rocket with Artificial Intelligence

http://www.astroman.com.pl/index.php?mod=magazine&a=read&id=872  


ASTROMAN Magazine - 2010.07.01

NEC Satellite Systems. HAYABUSA's seven-year journey in space

http://www.astroman.com.pl/index.php?mod=magazine&a=read&id=753  



ASTROMAN magazine


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