wydrukuj poleć znajomym zamów materiały
Od ilu lat pracuje Pani/Pan na różnych stanowiskach menedżerskich:

powyżej 20 lat
powyżej 15 lat
powyżej 10 lat
powyżej 5 lat
poniżej 5 lat
jeszcze nie byłam/-em menedżerem
nie chcę być menedżerem


Subskrypcja najnowszych ofert pracy





Nasi partnerzy:

rp.pl
gazeta.pl
onet.pl
interia.pl
wp.pl

DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials Conclude: Number 1 is SCHAFT 2014.01.02

After two days of competition, DARPA selected eight teams to receive up to $1 million in funding to continue their work. The scores, out of a total of 32 points, were: 27 points: SCHAFT (SCHAFT, Inc., Tokyo, Japan); 20 points: IHMC Robotics (Florida Institute for Human & Machine Cognition, Pensacola, Fla., USA); 18 points: Tartan Rescue (Carnegie Mellon University, National Robotics Engineering Center, Pittsburgh, Pa.); 16 points: Team MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Boston, Mass.); 14 points: RoboSimian (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Los Angeles, Calif.); 11 points: Team TRACLabs (TRACLabs, Inc., Webster, Tex.); 11 points: WPI Robotics Engineering C-Squad (Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Mass.); 9 points: Team Trooper (Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories, Cherry Hill, N.J., USA).

DARPA Super Strong Humanoid Robot SCHAFT.
SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking

Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 


After Impressive Demonstrations of Robot Skill, DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials Conclude



December 26, 2013


8 teams eligible to receive up to $1 million to prepare for upcoming DRC Finals


DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials Day Two Wrap

On December 20-21, 2013, 16 teams were the main attraction at the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) Trials, where they demonstrated their prototype robots’ ability to perform a number of critical real-world disaster-response skills.

 
 
DARPA constructed eight tasks at the Homestead Speedway in Homestead, Fla., USA to simulate what a robot might have to do to safely enter and effectively work inside a disaster zone, while its operator would remain out of harm’s way.

DARPA Super Strong Humanoid Robot SCHAFT.
SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking

Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
After two days of competition, DARPA selected eight teams to receive up to $1 million in funding to continue their work.

The scores, out of a total of 32 points, were:

• 27 points: SCHAFT (SCHAFT, Inc., Tokyo, Japan)

• 20 points: IHMC Robotics (Florida Institute for Human & Machine Cognition, Pensacola, Fla.)

• 18 points: Tartan Rescue (Carnegie Mellon University, National Robotics Engineering Center, Pittsburgh, Pa.)

• 16 points: Team MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Boston, Mass.)

• 14 points: RoboSimian (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Los Angeles, Calif.)

• 11 points: Team TRACLabs (TRACLabs, Inc., Webster, Tex.)

• 11 points: WPI Robotics Engineering C-Squad (Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Mass.)

• 9 points: Team Trooper (Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories, Cherry Hill, N.J.)


Team SCHAFT raises the arms of its S-One robot in victory after successfully completing the Climb Industrial Ladder task at the DRC Trials.
SCHAFT won that task and three others, and scored the most points of any team at the event.

Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
“At the start of the event, I said that I would be thrilled if even one team scored half the points available,”
said Gill Pratt, the DARPA program manager for the DRC, during the event’s closing ceremony.
“The event exceeded my expectations multiple, multiple times over, with the top four teams each scoring half or more. The success and reliability of the various hardware and software approaches that the teams demonstrated outside their laboratories was tremendous to see in action and sets an important baseline going forward.”

Ian, an Atlas robot with IHMC Robotics, successfully cuts a hole in a wall - a common action that human first responders perform.
IHMC Robotics won the Cut Through Wall task and ranked second overall in the competition.
Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
A number of teams also received special recognition in conducting the eight tasks based on the number of points received and speed:

• Walk Across Rough Terrain; Remove Debris from Doorway;
Climb Industrial Ladder;
Carry and Connect Fire Hose: SCHAFT

• Open Series of Doors;
Cut Through Wall: IHMC Robotics

• Drive and Exit Utility Vehicle: WRECS

• Locate and Close Leaking Valves: Team THOR



Tartan Rescue CHIMP, the CMU (Carnegie Mellon University) Highly Intelligent Mobile Platform, carries a fire hose to connect it to a wall spigot.
The robot from the Tartan Rescue team, CHIMP came in third overall in the competition.

Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
The awards ceremony capped off a second day in which spectators - including many families with children - enjoyed an atmosphere similar to a traditional sporting event, not a scientific exercise.

In addition to the Trials, DARPA hosted the DRC Exposition that demonstrated first responder exercises and their technology needs.



DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials Exposition

“The DRC Trials demonstrated the difficulty of having robots conduct seemingly simple tasks in real-world situations, and the participation of the first responder community provided an important illustration of how technology can save lives,” said Brad Tousley, Director of DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office.
“This event was yet another example why challenges work to attract new ideas and help quickly advance technology to solve a focused need.”

SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking
Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
With the conclusion of the DRC Trials, DARPA and the teams are now looking ahead to the DRC Finals sometime in the next 12-18 months.

The Finals will be an opportunity for the eight top teams and the other eight participating teams to continue their efforts alongside new teams to vie for the chance to win the DRC’s $2 million prize.

Pratt has already identified three initial goals for the next competition.


SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking
Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
“First, we’d like the robots to be more stable so they don’t fall, and if they do fall, be more robust so they won’t break,”
said Brad Tousley.
“Second, have the robots work without their tethers by using wireless communications and more efficient, self-contained power systems. Finally, we’d like the robots to use more task-level autonomy in unstructured environments such as those found in real disasters.”

SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking
Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
More information, images and video are available at
www.theroboticschallenge.org  


Dr. Gill A. Pratt
Program Manager, Defense Sciences Office


Dr. Gill Pratt joined DARPA as a Program Manager in the Defense Sciences Office in January 2010.

His primary interest is in the field of robotics. Specific areas include the development of declarative design methods that enhance the symbiosis between designer and design tool, hyper-rapid fabrication methods, interfaces that significantly enhance human/machine collaboration, mechanisms and control methods for enhanced mobility and manipulation, low impedance actuators, and improved platforms for post-secondary robotics education.

He also has a strong interest in the application of neuroscience techniques to robot perception and control.

Dr. Pratt holds a Doctor in Philosophy in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
His thesis is in the field of neurophysiology.

He was an Associate Professor and Director of the Leg Lab at MIT.

Subsequently, he became a Professor at Franklin W. Olin College, and before joining DARPA, was Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs and Research.

Dr. Pratt holds several patents in series elastic actuation and adaptive control.


DARPA Robotic Challenge (DRC)

The Department of Defense’s strategic plan calls for the Joint Force to conduct humanitarian, disaster relief and related operations.

Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
The plan identifies requirements to extend aid to victims of natural or man-made disasters and conduct evacuation operations.

Some disasters, however, due to grave risks to the health and wellbeing of rescue and aid workers, prove too great in scale or scope for timely and effective human response.

Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
The DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) will attempt to address this capability gap by promoting innovation in robotic technology for disaster-response operations.

The Department of Defense’s strategic plan calls for the Joint Force to conduct humanitarian, disaster relief and related operations.

SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking
Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
The plan identifies requirements to extend aid to victims of natural or man-made disasters and conduct evacuation operations.

Some disasters, however, due to grave risks to the health and wellbeing of rescue and aid workers, prove too great in scale or scope for timely and effective human response.

SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking
Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
The DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) will attempt to address this capability gap by promoting innovation in robotic technology for disaster-response operations.

The primary technical goal of the DRC is to develop ground robots capable of executing complex tasks in dangerous, degraded, human-engineered environments.

SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking
Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
Competitors in the DRC are expected to focus on robots that can use standard tools and equipment commonly available in human environments, ranging from hand tools to vehicles, with an emphasis on adaptability to tools with diverse specifications.

To achieve its goal, the DRC aims to advance the current state of the art in the enabling technologies of supervised autonomy in perception and decision-making, mounted and dismounted mobility, dexterity, strength, and platform endurance.

SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking
Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
Success with supervised autonomy, in particular, could allow control of robots by non-expert operators, lower the operator’s workload, and allow effective operation even with low-fidelity (low bandwidth, high latency, intermittent) communications.

The DRC consists of both robotics hardware and software development tasks and is structured to increase the diversity of innovative solutions by encouraging participation from around the world, including universities, small, medium and large businesses, and even individuals and groups with ideas on how to advance the field of robotics.

Detailed descriptions of the participant tracks are available in the DRC Broad Agency Announcement.

SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking
Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
A secondary goal of the DRC is to make software and hardware development for ground-robot systems more accessible to interested contributors, thereby lowering the cost of acquisition while increasing capabilities.

DARPA seeks to accomplish this by creating and providing government-furnished equipment (GFE) to some DRC participants in the form of a robotic hardware platform with arms, legs, torso and head.

Availability of this platform will allow teams without hardware expertise or hardware to participate. Additionally, all teams will have access to a government-furnished simulator created by DARPA and populated with models of robots, robot components and field environments.

The simulator will be an open-source, real-time, operator-interactive virtual test bed, and the accuracy of the models used in it will be rigorously validated on a physical test bed.

SCHAFT. DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking
Courtesy DARPA Robotics Challenge
 
DARPA hopes the creation of a widely available, validated, affordable, and community supported and enhanced virtual test environment will play a catalytic role in development of robotics technology, allowing new hardware and software designs to be evaluated without the need for physical prototyping.

The DRC Broad Agency Announcement was released on April 10, 2012.

The DRC kicked off on October 24, 2012, and is scheduled to run for approximately 27 months with three planned competitions, one virtual followed by two live.

Events are planned for June 2013, December 2013 and December 2014.

Additional details, including team information and event rules, are available at
http://www.theroboticschallenge.org  

Associated images posted on www.darpa.mil  

and video posted at www.youtube.com/darpatv  

may be reused according to the terms of the DARPA User Agreement,
available here:
http://go.usa.gov/nYr  

Tweet @darpa



SCHAFT – Profesjonalny ratownik nowej ery


Robot SCHAFT zbudowany przez japońską firmę SCHAFT, Inc. z siedzibą w Tokyo w Japonii, która od niedawna należy do koncernu Google, okazał się najsprawniejszy i wygrał konkurs na najlepszego zautomatyzowanego ratownika.

Zaprojektowany i wykonany przez Japończyków robot SCHAFT otrzymał 27 punktów z 32 możliwych do uzyskania.

Japoński robot Schaft zbudowany przez japońską firmę należącą obecnie do koncernu Google okazał się najsprawniejszy i wygrał konkurs na najlepszego zautomatyzowanego ratownika.
Dzięki uprzejmości
DARPA Robotic Challenge
 
DARPA Robotic Challenge to konkurs organizowany przez amerykańską agencję odpowiedzialną za rozwój technologii wojskowych.

Zawody maszyn mają wyłonić najlepszego robota zdolnego do samodzielnej akcji ratowniczej w razie klęsk żywiołowych.
Automaty mogą korzystać z narzędzi i sprzętu, jakie znajdą się pod ręką w miejscu katastrofy.

Pomysłodawcą konkursu i jego dyrektorem jest dr Gill Pratt z Tactical Technology Office DARPA.

Inspiracją do zainicjowania tych niecodziennych zawodów była katastrofa w elektrowni atomowej w Fukushimie.
Okazało się, że przy usuwaniu skutków takich zdarzeń roboty są niezastąpione.
Mogą również pomagać w operacjach humanitarnych.

Podczas konkursu roboty musiały wykonać osiem zadań:
samodzielne kierowanie samochodem terenowym,
usunięcie gruzu blokującego drzwi wejściowe,
wspinaczkę po drabinie,
wyszukanie i zamknięcie zaworu najbliższego od miejsca uszkodzenia węża strażackiego,
podłączenie kolejnego węża strażackiego do gniazda, otwarcie drzwi wejściowych i wejście do budynku, wykonanie dużego otworu w betonowej ścianie za pomocą narzędzia
.

Na wykonanie każdego zadania roboty miały tylko 30 minut.



Humanoidalny japoński robot Schaft

Humanoidalny robot Schaft zdobył 27 punktów na 32 możliwe do uzyskania i zdeklasował rywali.

Robot jest dziełem japońskiej firmy SCHAFT, Inc. kupionej niedawno przez koncern Google.

Według firmy Schaft koncepcja robota jest oparta na HRP-2, projekcie maszyny do pomocy w domu opracowanej na zlecenie japońskich władz.

Do konkursu konstruktorzy zmodyfikowali robota, m.in. ma mocniejszy napęd, udoskonalony system chodzenia i stabilizacji oraz nowe oprogramowanie.
W efekcie Schaft ma 1,48 m wysokości i waży 95 kg.


Amerykański humanoidalny robot IHMC

Drugie miejsce zajął zespół, który przygotował robota IHMC.
Zdobył on 20 punktów z 32 możliwych do uzyskania.

Inżynierowie IHMC Robotics (Florida Institute for Human & Machine Cognition) bazowali na robocie Atlas opracowanym i wykonanym przez amerykańską firmę Boston Dynamics.

Pierwsza czwórka robotów zakwalifikowanych do finału, który odbędzie się w grudniu 2014 roku.
Dzięki uprzejmości
DARPA Robotic Challenge
 
Na temat firmy Boston Dynamics oraz opracowanych i wykonanych przez tę firmę robotów, w tym o robocie humanoidalnym Atlas, pisaliśmy wielokrotnie w ASTROMAN Magazine.

Między innymi:
ASTROMAN Magazine - 2013.12.15
Boston Dynamics: Changing Your Idea of What Robots Can Do


http://www.astroman.com.pl/index.php?mod=magazine&a=read&id=1606  

ASTROMAN Magazine - 2011.02.27
Boston Dynamics is an equal opportunity employer


http://www.astroman.com.pl/index.php?mod=magazine&a=read&id=905  

Platforma Atlas to samodzielny humanoidalny robot, dla którego wystarczyło dopisać specjalne oprogramowanie dla realizacji udziału w tym konkursie.
Pozwala operatorowi w pełni panować nad niezwykle skomplikowaną maszyną, wyposażoną w zestaw czujników, siłowników, sztucznych stawów i kończyn.

Platforma Atlas jest według DARPA jednym z najbardziej zaawansowanych robotów, jakie kiedykolwiek zbudowano.
Była „fizyczną powłoką dla komputerowego mózgu i nerwów, które przez zespoły biorące udział w konkursie będą udoskonalone" – napisała DARPA.

Kilkanaście dni temu firma Boston Dynamics prawdopodobnie została zakupiona przez koncern Google.
Do chwili obecnej żadna ze stron nie potwierdziła tej transakcji na swojej stronie internetowej.


Amerykańskie roboty Tartan Rescue i Team MIT

Trzecie miejsce w konkursie zajął humanoidalny robot Tartan Rescue.

Robot Tartan Rescue został opracowany i wykonany przez specjalistów z National Robotics Engineering Center Uniwersytetu Carnegie Mellon w Pittsburghu w USA.

Tartan Rescue według konstruktorów łatwo dostosowuje się do otoczenia, ale zdobył jedynie 18 punktów z 32 możliwych do zdobycia.

Druga czwórka robotów (miejsca od 5 do 8) zakwalifikowanych do finału, który odbędzie się w grudniu 2014 roku.
Dzięki uprzejmości
DARPA Robotic Challenge
 
Jeszcze mniej punktów otrzymał czwarty w konkursie robot Team MIT.

Amerykański robot Team MIT został opracowany i wykonany przez specjalistów z Laboratorium Nauk Komputerowych i Sztucznej Inteligencji
(ang. Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory) w Massachusetts Institute of Technology w Bostonie, czyli na politechnice, która od wielu lat jest najbardziej prestiżową wyższą uczelnią kadr technicznych w USA.

Robot Team MIT otrzymał jedynie 16 punktów z 32 możliwych, czyli jedynie połowę punktów możliwych do zdobycia.


Klęska robota opracowanego przez NASA

Totalną klęskę w profesjonalnym DARPA Robotics Challenge poniósł amerykański robot NASA-JSC, czyli robot Valkyrie skonstruowany w Centrum Kosmicznym im. Johnsona w NASA.

Robot NASA-JSC jest rozwinięciem konstrukcyjnym Robonauta – humanoida, który trafił na Międzynarodową Stację Kosmiczną.
Dzięki swojej renomie, miał podobno największe możliwości zwycięstwa ze wszystkich robotów biorących udział w tym konkursie, ale robot NASA-JSC nie wykonał żadnego zadania i otrzymał... zero punktów.


Wyniki końcowe półfinału DARPA Robotic Challenge.
Pierwsza ósemka została zakwalifikowana do finału,
który odbędzie się w grudniu 2014 roku.
Dzięki uprzejmości
DARPA Robotic Challenge
 
DARPA Robotics Challenge jest podzielony na kilka etapów i trwa od 10 kwietnia 2012 roku.
Na każdym etapie uczestnicy, którzy zgłosili swoje projekty do konkursu, dostają dotacje od DARPA.

W czerwcu 2013 roku zostały przeprowadzone eliminacje robotów do półfinału DARPA Robotics Challenge w grudniu 2013 roku.

Przeprowadzony w dniach 20 i 21 grudnia 2013 roku półfinał DARPA Robotics Challenge na torze wyścigowym Homestead-Miami Speedway na Florydzie w USA wyłonił osiem zespołów, które będą uczestniczyć w wielkim finale DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals.

Wieli finał DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals zostanie przeprowadzony w grudniu 2014 roku.

Zwycięzca wielkiego finału w grudniu 2014 roku otrzyma nagrodę w wysokości 2 mln USD.


Source / Źródło: The DARPA Robotics Challenge

http://www.darpa.mil/  

http://www.theroboticschallenge.org  


Video
http://www.theroboticschallenge.org/  


Video
Meet DRC Team Schaft


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9_hegb_JJE#t=11  


Video
SCHAFT : DARPA Robotics Challenge 8 Tasks + Special Walking


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=diaZFIUBMBQ  


Video
DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials Live Broadcast - Day Two


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0o4B2R5kzw4  


Video
[DARPA Robotics Challenge] SCHAFT S-ONE "Ladder" Trial

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZj8A-JX4m8  


Video
[DARPA Robotics Challenge] SCHAFT S-ONE "Vehicle" Trial


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Wp4oPA7EYw  


Video
DARPA Super Strong Humanoid Robot SCHAFT


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfq4M5zswRw  



ASTROMAN Magazine - 2013.12.15

Boston Dynamics: Changing Your Idea of What Robots Can Do

http://www.astroman.com.pl/index.php?mod=magazine&a=read&id=1606  


ASTROMAN Magazine - 2011.02.27

Boston Dynamics is an equal opportunity employer

http://www.astroman.com.pl/index.php?mod=magazine&a=read&id=905  



ASTROMAN magazine


wydrukuj ten artykuł
  strona: 1 z 1
polecamy artykuły
Mobile World Congress 2018. Barcelona, 26 February - 1 March 2018
Gala Property Design Awards 2018 w Katowicach
XTPL consistently pursuing commercialization of its breakthrough technology on the global market
SpaceX: Falcon Heavy Test Launch
Intel Xeon D-2100 Processor Extends Intelligence to Edge, Enabling New Capabilities for Cloud, Network and Service Providers
Siemens: Wunsiedel. A revolution in power distribution
Gary Gilliland: Cancer Research In 2018. Advances That Will Propel Us To Cures
NASA: Celebrating 60 Years of Groundbreaking U.S. Space Science
NASA: Studying the Van Allen Belts 60 Years After America's First Spacecraft
Rok 2018 w Centrum Sztuki Współczesnej Zamek Ujazdowski w Warszawie. Tak wiele w tak małym
Davos 2018: To Prevent a Digital Dark Age. World Economic Forum Launches Global Centre for Cybersecurity
Davos 2018: ABB and City of Davos pave the way to sustainable mobility through e-vehicle innovation
Tytuły "Ten, który zmienia polski przemysł" nadane przez Magazyn Gospodarczy Nowy Przemysł
Asseco wdrożyło na GPW nowoczesny system dostępowy do platformy obrotu Universal Trading Platform
IBM and Salesforce Strengthen Strategic Partnership
strona główna  |  oferty pracy  |  executive search  |  ochrona prywatności  |  warunki używania  |  kontakt     RSS feed subskrypcja RSS
Copyright ASTROMAN © 1995-2018. Wszelkie prawa zastrzeżone.
Projekt i wykonanie: TAU CETI.